Anna's Costume Completed

Sow with a combination of a chemise (McCalls' 4548), boned bodice (simplicity 5582), a simple drawstring skirt, and a few purchased items (Minetonka Moc's and some Bloomers) we got together a pretty decent pre-1840's rendezvous outfit! 

Just some quick iPhone pictures. Don't worry we intend to fully ham it up once we're actually at the rendezvous, taking pictures in period surroundings will hopefully bring the costumes to life! I'm trying to finish my own costume tonight, so expect a quick sneak peak at that as well! 

Simplicity 5582 : A Second Run.

So I'm making two sets of costumes for the pre-1840's Rendezvous. I finished my friend Anna's Costume bodice over the weekend. It's the same as my mismatched plaid disaster (which I fixed btw, more on that later) and was much easier to piece together. It's lined with a linen-look fabric and trimmed with navy bias tape. 

I actually really like the process of setting grommets. The boning was basically the easiest thing ever as well. The only thing I don't like is how the peplum edge on the inside is sewn so the raw edge is on the inside of the garment. I might encase it if I get time after the event, but for now, no one would be the wiser. 

Simplicity 5582 Pattern Matching Fail

Guys, friends don't let friends let their fabric get off grain. 

I'm actually pretty pleased with how this bodice is coming out. I even get to use grommets for for first time! Although I spent a good deal of time matching up my plaids, I didn't realize the back of the folded fabric had gotten off grain. I was really doing very well everywhere but that one spot. You know right in the front of the garment. (Face Palm).

See? In fact I might just go buy a half yard and fix it it's bothering me so much. Anyone else have a good sewing fail this week?

Thoughts On The Bum Roll.

Yes, you read right. Thoughts on the Bum Roll. I've been in a costuming sewing marathon because of the upcoming living history event I'm attending. The event is Pre-1840's. Normally I don't go above and beyond in my costuming. Since I've been planning a little better this year, I thought I would throw some foundation garments into the mix. For those of you who don't know what a bum roll is, it's basically a pillow you tie around your waist to make your booty look like a table. Case in point, Claire from the show Outlander wears one. 

Outlander is copyright The Starz Channel

While looking at the photos you don't think wearing said bum roll would be all together not too awful, but let me tell you, it's strange. It's pretty much opposite of what you want to do with modern clothing. I'm not sure I need any help in the shelf shaped booty department either. Using Simplicity 5882 I made the bum roll. Check it out on my dress form. 

The Chemise is Simplicity McCalls' 4548 (Which I think is discontinued?). I ended up hating the Kannik's Korner Pattern. The instructions were a mess. I completed the chemise though, and despised it enough to cut out a completely different pattern. But that's a whole other post. The bum roll was easy. So easy you pretty much don't need a pattern. Instead of twill tape I made fabric tubes from the left over muslin from the chemise. I threw a simple drawstring petticoat over the bum roll to see what kind of effect I'd be getting in the photo below. 

It's honestly kind of intense ha. Once I have my heavier over-skirt on though, I think it might downplay the volume of the bum roll a bit? Anyone here have any experience with bum rolls? I was thinking I might make a pair of hip pads instead to see if those suit me better!

On The Sewing Table : Kannik's Korner Woman's Shift 1790-1820

Surprisingly I'm sewing something not for myself at the moment. This is in fact for my Grandmother. What can I say, love of costuming runs deep in my family! In fact, so deep that my Aunt hosts thousands of people at her farm every other year for a pre-1840's primitive rendezvous. Think historical camping. Think french fur traders. It's kind of a blast, and everything needs to be period correct. So She's commissioned me to make her a long sleeve version of this pattern.

kind of boring right? I assure you it's completely necessary, and probably the most important garment for your get up. You wear it under your skirt, stays, and apron. Or if you're bougie enough to have a dress, under that.

Although this pattern looks easy enough, every seam is flat felled. It's not hard to do, but certainly more time consumer than using my serger, which I'm sure would be frowned upon. I'm currently hardworking the eyelet holes and should hopefully be done this weekend. Anyone else doing some historical sewing? 

Gingerbread Spice Dutch Baby

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A dutch baby as described by Wikipedia -

"Dutch baby pancake, sometimes called a German pancake,[1] a Bismarck, or a Dutch puff, is a sweet popover that is normally served for breakfast. It is derived from the German pfannkuchen. It is made with eggsfloursugar and milk, and usually seasoned with vanilla and cinnamon, although occasionally fruit or another flavoring is also added. It is baked in a cast iron or metal pan and falls soon after being removed from the oven. It is generally served with fresh squeezed lemon, butter, and powdered sugar, fruit toppings or syrup. A basic batter incorporates 1/3 cup flour and 1/3 cup liquid per egg."

A dutch baby as described by me- 

"Delicous."

So having no clue how to make one I turned to some of my cookbooks.The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook  hasn't ever really let me down in the past and this is no exception. I omitted the cloves and they tasted to me a bit like pumpkin spice dutch babies. In the way that pumpkin spice lattes don't contain any real pumpkin that is. 

 

Yield: Makes 2. 

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoon packed brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoon light molasses (I used cane syrup)
  • 2/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2/8 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2/3 cup whole milk
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • Powdered Sugar
  • Lemon

DIRECTIONS

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Place the eggs in a blender and blend for 1 to 2 minutes, until smooth and pale in color. Add the brown sugar, molasses, flour, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, salt, and milk and blend until smooth.
  2. Melt the 2 tablespoons butter in a 8-inch ovenproof skillet over high heat, swirling it up the sides to evenly coat the pan. Pour half the batter into the skillet and immediately transfer to the oven. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until the pancake is puffed up. Remove from the oven, dust with powdered sugar, and drizzle with lemon juice. Serve immediately. (I cooked two skillets simultaneously without issue.)

 

Something New.

I've run Lux Per Diem for the past 3 years, it was time for something new. Consider "Very Paige" that something new. While I've tried to define my niche over the years as a blogger, I always regret trying to stick to one topic and my blogging suffers. This blog will encompass anything and everything that appeals to me, it's very me so to speak. There might be some dust over the next couple of days, but bare with me as I get everything into top shape. 

For those of you who need information from the old blog posts, you can find them here. 

♥ Paige

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